Anthony Miller Harrison, M.D.
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Anthony Miller Harrison, M.D.

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HARRISON: Anthony Miller Harrison, M.D., born on December 6, 1938, and died on Monday, January 28, 2019, due to the debilitating and progressive symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Harrison lived his life devoted to and embraced by his family, friends and profession. He is survived by his wife, Rosanne Isay Harrison; children, Alexander Marc (Mary Carole), Edward Isay (Mary Lou) and Janet Harrison Kuzmishin (John). He was the beloved grandfather of Alex, Martin, Rosetta, Benjamin, Elliott, Thomas, Rachel and Samuel. He is also survived by his brother Michael (Susan Graham) and nephew, Craig. Tony, son of Milton Harrison, M.D. and Mamie May Gross Barron, was born in Philadelphia. He moved to Pittsburgh, lived in Squirrel Hill and attended Allderdice High School. Tony and Rosanne met when they were 14 and married 9 years later on June 23, 1962. Tony attended Washington and Jefferson College. He credited W&J with providing the foundation for his future academic accomplishments and love of learning. He excelled at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia and was inspired to become a surgeon. Tony, now Dr. Harrison, completed his internship at Montefiore Hospital in Pittsburgh and then joined the U.S. Public Health Service Hospital in Boston. After his tour in the North Atlantic, he returned home to Pittsburgh, drawn by his strong devotion to family and community. He completed a surgical residency and burn fellowship at the Western Pennsylvania Hospital. With a handshake, Dr. Harrison joined Sidney A. Rosenburg, M.D. in surgical practice and established General Surgical Associates. Under his leadership, the practice grew to be the largest private surgical group in Western Pennsylvania. He was principal in the formation of the Penn Group Health Plan, which later became Health America, where he served as the Chief of Surgery. After years in private practice, Dr. Harrison joined the Department of Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC as a professor of surgery. This role enabled him to fully demonstrate his love of medicine, commitment to patients and surgical skills to numerous medical students and residents. He worked to instill in them dedication, competence, humility and the importance of waking up early as he rounded on all of his patients before his first surgical case! He received multiple teaching awards for his devotion to students and the profession. He was vice chairman and the chief for the Division of Community Surgery as well as a consultant and director for IsMeTT, a transplant and research facility managed by UPMC in Palermo, Sicily. He served on the board of trustees for Montefiore Hospital, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and the Jewish Healthcare Foundation. Tony spent the majority of his weekends and holidays at Deep Creek Lake. He enjoyed sailing, snow and water skiing and fishing (all skills learned as an adult). He particularly enjoyed doing yard work and spending time in his garden. He was the weekend chef with many successes (soufflés) and failures (rhubarb pie). He needlepointed for many years and was fond of reminding people that, as a surgeon, he “sewed for a living.” According to Tony, his most valued accomplishments were “the most wonderful marriage; three loving, decent, humane and intelligent children; and a professional life filled with constant challenge, intellectual stimulation, kind and appreciative patients and fine students who have excelled in their work.” He asked that his epitaph read “He had the best of all things and knew it.” If desired, memorial donations may be directed to the Jewish Association on Aging, the Humane Society, The Anthony M. Harrison, M.D. and Rosanne Isay Harrison International Education Fund, Medical and Health Services Foundation, 3600 Forbes Avenue at Meyran Ave, Forbes Tower, Suite #8084, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 or another cause of your choice. Services and interment were private. Arrangements entrusted to Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., family owned and operated. schugar.com

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